Yuhei Ishikawa and the Kokushikan men’s rhythmic gymnastics team

News
Yuhei Ishikawa
Yuhei Ishikawa

Yuhei Ishikawa and the Kokushikan men’s rhythmic gymnastics team

by: Sarah Hodge | .
Stripes Japan | .
published: August 09, 2017
Editor's Note: Japanese translation of story at end of English version.
 
A solitary figure crouches next to a decorated wooden stick, the light glittering on his crystal-studded sleeve. As the music begins, Yuhei Ishikawa gracefully springs to his feet and works the expanse of the spring floor with fluid, expressive movements. His dexterous handling of the stick makes the complicated twirls and impressive aerial catches seem effortless before launching into a series of roundoffs, one-handed cartwheels, and complicated somersaults with twists, all while maintaining a hold on the stick. From his striking black-and-silver competition outfit to his innate ability to express his emotions through music, it is impossible to take your eyes away as he moves from one element to the next. 
 
Men’s rhythmic gymnastics (MRG) is a sport born in Japan nearly 70 years ago. Although many in Japan (and increasingly abroad) are familiar with team MRG (synchronized routines by top Japanese high school and university teams have been viewed over 30 million times on YouTube and social media), it would seem that individual men’s rhythmic gymnastics is not as well known. However, the current “golden generation” of charismatic gymnasts such as Yuhei Ishikawa is introducing the beauty of this unique sport to the world.
  
Individual MRG uses four apparatus: clubs, stick, rope and double rings. During a competition, each individual gymnast performs four separate routines, one for each apparatus. Individual performances clock in at a brief 1:15 - 1:30, and points are based a 20-point scale. The first 10-point scale measures composition (difficulty) based on technical value, variety, harmony between music and movements, and originality, while the execution of performance is a maximum of 10 points. The individual scores of all four routines for each gymnast are then added up to decide the all-around winner.
 
Ishikawa’s expressive individual routines have earned him 5th place for rope at the All Japan Junior Championships in 2013, wins in the Kanto Area Competition in 2015 and 2016, three consecutive wins at the Kanto Championships as a high school student, and 5th place for stick at the All Japan Championships in 2016 (he was one of only three high school students to make the final cut). At the 2017 All Eastern Inter-College Championships, he got 4th for all-around, and 2nd for rope. In addition to choreographing his own routines, he spends a great deal of time choosing music, carefully weighing how his selections will influence the audience’s perception of him and his apparatus (Ishikawa’s favorite is the stick).
 
As we conduct our interview in Kokushikan’s cavernous gym, there are several simultaneous team and individual run-throughs going on around us. I’m struck by the calm Ishikawa exudes and the thought he puts into his answers. Now eighteen, he started artistic gymnastics around age seven; his mother felt his flexibility made him a good candidate for gymnastics. At twelve, he began studying men’s rhythmic gymnastics with the Kokushikan Junior RG team, graduated to the Kokushikan High School RG Team, and is currently a freshman with Kokushikan University MRG Team, which routinely places in the top three at national competitions and performs abroad. 
 
Performing with an elite university team means a grueling practice schedule after classes and on weekends. “At times I find it difficult to stay motivated to practice,” Ishikawa admits, “But even when I don’t feel like practicing, I try to think of it as a good opportunity. My proudest moment as a gymnast is when I performed my routine without errors and was greeted with wild cheers from the audience, and when fans told me that they liked my performance.” His personal goal for this competition year is to remain among the top eight gymnasts for all four apparatus at All Japan.
 
He aspires to be like legendary Aomori University gymnast Kyohei Oshita of MRG performance group BLUE TOKYO (http://bluetokyo.jp/en/), who he feels is "the best of the best.” Ishikawa’s expressive performance style also calls to mind fellow Kokushikan gymnast Hayami Yumita, now a performer with Cirque du Soleil’s Varekai.
 
Ishikawa reflects that his own strengths as an individual gymnast are his flexibility and clean movements.
 
“Although there are many gymnasts who are better than me,” he adds modestly, "When I am on the mat at competitions, I want the audience to look at me and enjoy watching me perform, and I think that feeling is stronger than anybody," he said.
 
Even as a freshman, it is evident that he will go far. Ishikawa dreams of becoming a performer. 
For youth interested in becoming MRG athletes, Ishikawa advises, “When you first watch men’s rhy
thmic gymnastics, you might think “Oh, it is impossible for me!” rather than “I want to do it!” However, it is not true. Everybody can. I could. So, be brave and have confidence in yourself, and start MRG!”
 
Ishikawa’s next competition will be全日本インカレ (All Japan Inter-College) August 15-17 at Morioka Takaya Arena; the event is free. More information can be found at http://gymgakurenn.noor.jp/h29rgyoukou.pdf. (Japanese only)
 
This interview was made possible with generous support from the following:
Coach Kotaro Yamada, Kokushikan University Men’s Rhythmic Gymnastics Team
Yuhei Ishikawa 
Ayako Shimizu, GymLove (http://gymlove.net/rgl/) sportswriter and photographer 
Japan Gymnastics Association
 
To watch Yuhei in action, check out this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCBtjPDIjYQ).
 
石川裕平
国士舘大学 男子新体操選手
サラ・ハッジ
 
精巧に装飾された木製のスティックの隣に静かにうずくまる人影。袖に飾られたクリスタルがキラキラとライトに反射する。音楽が始まると、石川裕平選手は優雅に、弾かれるように立ち上がり、フロアいっぱいに表現力豊かで滑らかな動きを見せる。彼がスティックを操ると、難しい手具操作や驚くような投げ受けもいとも簡単そうに見えてしまう。続いて今度はひらりと舞い上がり、フロアの対角線上でロンダート、側転、ひねりの入った複雑なタンブリングを見せる。その間、手にはスティックが握られたままだ。黒と銀色の印象的な試合着、音楽を通して感情を伝える天性の表現力。一つの要素から次の要素へとなめらかに動く彼から目を離すことができない。
 
男子新体操(MRG)は日本発祥のスポーツで、70年あまりの歴史を持つ。団体演技は、日本のトップレベルの大学生や高校生チームの演技がYouTubeやソーシャルメディアで3,000万回以上も見られるなど、日本で(そして海外でも次第に)多くの人に知られるようになってきているが、個人演技は団体ほど知られていないようだ。しかし、石川裕平選手と同年代の、カリスマ性を持つ現役の個人選手たちは「黄金世代」と呼ばれ、この独特なスポーツの美しさを海外に広めるきっかけになっているのだ。
 
男子新体操個人では、クラブ、スティック、ロープ、リングの4種類の手具を使う。試合では、選手たちは各手具にひとつずつ4つの異なる演技を行う。演技時間は1:15-1:30で、技術的価値、多様性、音楽と動きの調和、独創性等からなる構成点10点、実施の正確さを測る実施点10点の20点満点で採点される。そして4種目(クラブ、スティック、ロープ、リング)の合計得点で、個人総合の勝者が決まる。
 
石川選手は2013年の全日本ジュニア選手権でロープ5位、2015年と2016年の関東大会優勝、関東選手権は高校時代に3連覇を達成。2016年の全日本選手権ではスティックで5位(種目別決勝に残った高校生は3名のみで、そのうちの一人)。2017年の東日本インカレでは総合4位、ロープ2位を獲得している。演技の振り付けを自分で行うだけでなく、音楽の選択にもじゅうぶんな時間をかけ、観客から自分がどのように見えるか、その時使われている手具に音楽がどのような影響を与えるかを慎重に見極めて伴奏曲を選ぶという(石川選手の好きな手具はスティック)。
 
石川選手へのインタビューは国士舘大学の天井の高い体育館で行われたが、インタビューの間も団体や個人演技の通しが同時に行われていた。そのような中で石川選手が醸し出す冷静さと、質問に答える時の思慮深さに私は感銘を受けた。彼は現在18歳だが、7歳頃に、体が柔らかいので体操に向いているかもしれないと考えた母の勧めで器械体操を始めた。12歳の時に国士舘ジュニアというチームで男子新体操を始め、国士舘高校進学後も新体操部で活躍、現在は国士舘大学の1年生である。国士舘大学男子新体操部は国内大会で常に上位の成績をおさめるかたわら、海外でも演技を披露している。
 
国士舘大学のような強豪チームにいれば、授業が終わったあとや週末にも練習の予定がびっしりだ。「時には毎日の練習でモチベーションを保てないこともあります。」と石川選手は言う。「でも、練習をやりたくないと思う日は、逆にチャンスだと考えます。新体操選手として最高だと感じる瞬間は、ノーミスで演技をやりきって大きな歓声をもらった時や、ファンの方々に自分の演技が好きだと声をかけてもらう時です。」今年の目標は、全日本選手権で4種目とも種目別決勝に残ることだ。
 
石川選手の憧れは、青森大学出身で現在は男子新体操のパフォーマンスグループBLUE TOKYO(http://bluetokyo.jp/en/)で活躍している大舌恭平選手。彼にとって大舌選手は「まさに最高の選手」なのだ。また、石川選手の情感溢れるパフォーマンスは、国士舘大学出身の先輩であり、現在はシルク・ドゥ・ソレイユ「Varekai」のパフォーマーである弓田速未選手を思い起こさせる。
 
石川選手は、個人選手としての自分の強みは柔軟性と美しい徒手だと考えている。
 
「自分より強い選手はたくさんいます。」と彼は謙虚に語った。「でも僕は試合でマットの上に立った時、観客に自分を見てほしいと思うし、自分の演技を楽しんでほしい。その気持ちは誰よりも強いと思っています。」まだ大学1年生ではあるが、注目株であることは間違いない。石川選手の夢は、パフォーマーになることだ。
男子新体操をやってみたいと思っている子供たちに言いたいことは?という質問にはこう答えた。「男子新体操を初めて見る人は、自分もやりたい!というより自分には無理だ!と思ってしまうかもしれないけれども、そんなことはないと思います。誰にだってできるし、自分もできました。だから勇気と自信をもって男子新体操を始めてみてください!」
 
石川選手の次の試合は、全日本インカレだ。8月15~17日、盛岡タカヤアリーナにて。観戦無料。詳細はこちら。http://gymgakurenn.noor.jp/h29rgyoukou.pdf(日本語のみ)
 
このインタビューを実現するにあたり、次の方々から惜しみないご協力を賜りました。
国士舘大学男子新体操部監督 山田小太郎先生
石川裕平さん
ジムラブ(http://gymlove.net/rgl/)スポーツライター兼写真家 清水綾子さん
日本体操協会
Tags: News
Related Content: No related content is available