Gate guard recognized for life-saving actions

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Hiromitsu Moro, assistant chief for Tokyo Fire Department, left, presents the Distinguished Service Award to Kan Saito, guard supervisor, Provost Marshal Office at Hardy Barracks, right, during a recognition ceremony May 9, 2018 at TFD to honor his actions that helped save a young boy’s life. (U.S. Army photo by Lance D. Davis)
Hiromitsu Moro, assistant chief for Tokyo Fire Department, left, presents the Distinguished Service Award to Kan Saito, guard supervisor, Provost Marshal Office at Hardy Barracks, right, during a recognition ceremony May 9, 2018 at TFD to honor his actions that helped save a young boy’s life. (U.S. Army photo by Lance D. Davis)

Gate guard recognized for life-saving actions

by: Takahiro Takiguchi | .
Stripes Japan | .
published: May 11, 2018

A Japanese gate guard at Hardy Barracks was recently recognized for his quick action to help save the life of a young boy in Tokyo.

On the evening of April 20, Kan Saito was off duty with his father at a restaurant in Kasai, Tokyo when a woman’s screaming stopped them as they were leaving.

Saito rushed toward the voice and found the boy lying down in a chair beside his mother. The boy was pale and unresponsive when Saito tried to speak to him, so he moved the boy to the floor to check for a pulse and breathing. After realizing that the boy was in a state of cardiac arrest, Saito called 119 (911), asked his father to get an AED at a police station nearby, and began CPR on the child.

In a few minutes, Saito’s father came back with a police officer and AED, which ended up not needing to be used. Saito then continued CPR for another 10 minutes.

“As a member of PMO (Provost Marshals Office), we have been trained to take the right action without hesitation wherever and whenever,” Saito said.

As Saito continued CPR, the child resumed breathing and the color returned to his face, which was a great sign, according to Saito.

Within minutes, an ambulance arrived and took the boy to the hospital.

The following day, Saito received calls from the Tokyo Fire Department and the boy’s mother and learned that the child had fully recovered.

“I don’t know what my son would be if you hadn’t helped him,” The mother told Saito. “I can’t thank you enough for what you have done to my son.”

“That really made me feel great,” Saito said. “I was proud of myself that I had been able to take a right action.”

To acknowledge his life-saving actions, the Tokyo Fire Department presented the “Shobo Shokan Sho” (Chief Fire Officer Award).

Saito has been working at Hardy Barracks as a member of U.S. Army PMO for two years, after his working for PMO on Yokota AB for three years.

“The award will be good motivation for me to keep up my training and get myself prepared for another unexpected incident,” Saito said.

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