USACE JED on Camp Zama ‘demolishes’ fiscal year record

Last-minute edits are made on a funding analysis table during the end of the U.S. federal government fiscal year 2022 at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Japan Engineer District on Camp Zama, Japan. Tables like these, along with other financial statistics are necessary for the accounting, budget, and resource management offices to reference when submitting their year-end totals for the fiscal year, which begins every October 1st.
Last-minute edits are made on a funding analysis table during the end of the U.S. federal government fiscal year 2022 at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Japan Engineer District on Camp Zama, Japan. Tables like these, along with other financial statistics are necessary for the accounting, budget, and resource management offices to reference when submitting their year-end totals for the fiscal year, which begins every October 1st.

USACE JED on Camp Zama ‘demolishes’ fiscal year record

by Patrick Ciccarone
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Japan District

Keyboard clacks and mice clicks echoed throughout the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Japan Engineer District (USACE JED) building, mimicking machine-gun fire. Staples and paper rained like confetti after a New Year’s countdown, and telephone rings pierced the air akin to mini raid sirens—what event could invoke such an image of chaos?

Why, the annual U.S. federal government fiscal year close-out, of course!

A fiscal year, also known as a financial year, describes a 12-month accounting period for budgeting purposes. In the U.S. federal government, the fiscal year runs from October 1st through September 30th.

While many organizations dread the impending stress related to the FY, USACE JED’s accounting and budgeting departments tackle the close-out with a steely grit and laser focus—like most engineers at The District pursue their projects. This year, their construction projects weren’t the only thing that went out sky-high.

JED awarded a whopping 341 contract actions— purchases of facility construction or repairs, supplies or equipment for the laymen, totaling $434 million during FY22, the largest year on record, and an astounding $269 million more than previously executed compared to FY21.

“JED participated in numerous projects this year—some were new, and some were continuations of long-term, complex projects that have been ongoing for years,” said Jake Shaw, the district contracting chief for JED. “It is our mission to provide our stakeholders with engineering and construction expertise, and the numerous large projects awarded this year demonstrate that we are a highly relevant organization that is [capable of meeting their needs.]”

Among the veritable laundry list of contracts JED was awarded this year were Military Construction (MILCON) projects to replace schools, renovate housing areas, build aircraft hangars, and replace or upgrade fueling systems.

A recent project seen to its conclusion was the re-opening of the newly refurbished and renovated EJ King Middle High School, located on Commander, Fleet Activities Sasebo in Nagasaki. Part of an education complex whose project timeline, including multiple school replacements or renovations, spanned nearly a decade.

But whether JED is drafting schematics for their newest contract, reaching out to stakeholders to nab high-visibility bids, or setting the explosive charges on old sites to pave way for new projects, efficiency and professionalism take precedence.

“This FY saw major transitions in JED leadership while we executed a complex portfolio of large projects and endured continuing restrictions and precautionary measures related to COVID-19,” asserted Shaw. “It is amazing what we were able to accomplish during this period, but more importantly than the dollar amounts or statistics is that we are providing our stakeholders with the facilities and other technical solutions they need to meet their mission.”

Giving credit where it is due, The District’s commander gave a heartfelt message of appreciation to all who contributed to JED’s successful FY.

“The reason for our success is you, plain and simple. Without [everyone’s] hard work we could not do what we do,” said JED commander, U.S. Army Col. Gary Bonham. “I am not only proud to serve as your commander, but I am also proud to have you as my team here in Japan representing the USACE.”

As the first crisp winds of autumn begin to stir here in Japan and October marks the start of a new FY, the engineers of JED can breathe a collective sigh of relief now that crunch time is over.

Ever the over-achievers though, JED won’t rest on their laurels for too long.

“Everyone who works at JED, and everyone who is a JED alumnus should be proud of what we accomplished as a team,” said Shaw. “Now we look forward to the next FY, which should be another challenging and rewarding experience.”

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