American bases near Tokyo escape deadly Typhoon Hagibis with minimal damage

Workers assess debris from Typhoon Hagibis that collected along the water's edge at Yokosuka Naval Base, Japan, Sunday, Oct. 13, 2019. CAITLIN DOORNBOS/STARS AND STRIPES
Workers assess debris from Typhoon Hagibis that collected along the water's edge at Yokosuka Naval Base, Japan, Sunday, Oct. 13, 2019. CAITLIN DOORNBOS/STARS AND STRIPES

American bases near Tokyo escape deadly Typhoon Hagibis with minimal damage

by Caitlin Doornbos and Hana Kusumoto
Stars and Stripes

TOKYO — Typhoon Hagibis pummeled the Japanese capital overnight Saturday with wind gusts as high as 104 mph, hours of record-breaking torrential rain and flooding in some places.

And then suddenly the storm left the Tokyo metro area, leaving many to wonder on social media if the ordeal was really over. Sunday dawned beneath calm, blue skies as the curious emerged to take stock of fallen trees and swollen rivers.

U.S. military bases in the area reported minimal damage and returned to their routines after a full day hunkered down against record-breaking rain and strong wind.

At Yokota Air Base — home of U.S Forces Japan in western Tokyo — Senior Airman Mitchell Krause, 24, of Chaska, Minn., was shopping at a base mini-mart early Sunday. The security forces airman said he worked the night shift during the storm but experienced no emergencies.

Read more at: https://www.stripes.com/1.602903

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