Yokota airmen improve gas mask with 3D printer, potentially saving Air Force $8 million or more

Base Info
Airmen from Yokota Air Base, Japan, show off modifications they made to an M-50 gas mask that allow it to be connected to the onboard oxygen system of an aircraft, Friday, June 1, 2018.  SETH ROBSON/STARS AND STRIPES
From Stripes.com
Airmen from Yokota Air Base, Japan, show off modifications they made to an M-50 gas mask that allow it to be connected to the onboard oxygen system of an aircraft, Friday, June 1, 2018. SETH ROBSON/STARS AND STRIPES

Yokota airmen improve gas mask with 3D printer, potentially saving Air Force $8 million or more

by: Seth Robson | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: June 08, 2018

YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan — Tokyo-based airmen used a 3D printer and American ingenuity to modify a standard-issue gas mask into an aircraft oxygen system, potentially saving millions of dollars and improving aircrew safety.

The idea of hooking up the M-50 joint-service, general-purpose mask to an aircraft was hatched during brainstorming sessions by airmen from Yokota’s 374th Maintenance Squadron and 374th Operations Support Squadron.

“We took the mask and added some off-the-shelf parts and some 3D-printed parts and converted it into a piece of equipment that can work in an aircraft,” said Senior Master Sgt. David Siemiet, an aircrew flight equipment superintendent.

Gear used now — the Aircrew Eye/Respiratory Protection System, or AERPS — is expensive, heavy and fault prone with long waits for replacement parts, said C-130 Hercules pilot Capt. Matthew Kohl.

Read more at: https://www.stripes.com/1.531504

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