Namjatown offers weird food and games you won't understand

Travel
Even a Japanese translator could not understand how the "Explosive Mosquito Killing Mission" ride at Tokyo's Namco Namjatown worked.  Trevor Andersen/Stars and Stripes
From Stripes.com
Even a Japanese translator could not understand how the "Explosive Mosquito Killing Mission" ride at Tokyo's Namco Namjatown worked. Trevor Andersen/Stars and Stripes

Namjatown offers weird food and games you won't understand

by: Trevor Andersen | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: March 17, 2014

Weird.
 
There’s no other way to explain Namjatown, a food-themed amusement park in Tokyo.
 
The attraction is tucked away inside the Sunshine City shopping complex in Ikebukuro, and for the location, it’s surprisingly large.
 
Visiting Namjatown feels similar to walking through a giant haunted house; except instead of using monsters and ghastly creatures to scare you, they serve you things like beef tongue ice cream.
 
Oh, there are ghosts, too.
 
The Grudge Inn, the ghostly part of the park, is based on Japanese folklore. Here, you can run around trying to take photos of ghosts with rented ghost-hunting equipment. The equipment looks like it came out of a Ghostbusters movie and it makes noise to let you know when you’re near enough to a ghost for a photo. As far as I know the ghosts were imaginary, but I couldn’t be sure. Along the walls are little statues of spiders with human faces that will visit you in your nightmares.
 
I brought along a Japanese friend to translate and help me understand what was happening. He was of no help at Namjatown.
 
The tiny but delicious dumplings at Gyoza Stadium, along with a pint of beer, made the crazy go down easier.
 
Then we made our way to Ice Cream City, where we ate several bizarre flavors of ice cream including miso ramen and whiskey. The whiskey was delicious and boozy, while the miso ramen was gross — there were chunks of noodles in it.
 
The park is mainly for Japanese children, but at lunchtime on a Tuesday it was full of college students, too.
 
If you don’t speak Japanese, you won’t understand much. If you do speak Japanese, you’re just as likely to be confused.
 
Either way, chances are you’ll have a good time, some tasty Japanese food and quite a story to tell your friends.
 
andersen.trevor@stripes.com
 

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