Yokota keeps the mission in sight

News
Seina Karr, 12, daughter of Tech Sgt. Ryan Karr, 374th Civil Engineer Squadron, looks through a Nidek RT-5100 Refractor to be checked for a prescription for glasses at Yokota Air Base, Japan, April 26, 2016. Yokota members are able to receive glasses prescription update, refractive eye surgery and gas mask inserts from the clinic.
Seina Karr, 12, daughter of Tech Sgt. Ryan Karr, 374th Civil Engineer Squadron, looks through a Nidek RT-5100 Refractor to be checked for a prescription for glasses at Yokota Air Base, Japan, April 26, 2016. Yokota members are able to receive glasses prescription update, refractive eye surgery and gas mask inserts from the clinic.

Yokota keeps the mission in sight

by: Story and photo by: Senior Airman David Owsianka, 374th Airlift Wing Public Affairs | .
Stripes Japan | .
published: May 05, 2016
YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- If you have blurry vision, problems with depth perception or an injured eye there is an office that meets your needs to fix all of these problems. The 374th Aerospace Medicine Squadron Optometry Clinic treats visual needs for service members, Department of Defense employees and their dependents.
 
The clinic takes care of the treatment for vision and ocular disorders and provides diagnostic needs for approximately 5,000 personnel annually. They also administer basic eye care, contact lens fitting and extensive disease care.
 
"If a pilots vision is not taken care of, they may struggle when it comes to flying a plane, and if personnel cannot properly see downrange, they may not be able to effectively fire their weapons," said Tech. Sgt. Jonghwan Kim, 374 AMS optometry clinic NCO in charge. "We take care of the overall health care for base personnel's eyes to ensure they can safely perform their jobs."
 
Optometry patients will begin their eye examination with technicians performing initial inspections to provide the doctor with the necessary information to give a proper examination. Once the doctor is done, the technicians will receive a prescription to order the necessary items for the patient.
 
Having an optometry clinic on base allows service members and their dependents to have easier access to a facility to have their eyes taken care of.
 
"While being in another country, it would be difficult for personnel to go off base and visit a Japanese clinic because most will be unable to speak the same language," said Michelle Durham, Red Cross volunteer optometrist. "If we were not here, a lot of people probably would not have their vision needs met and that would keep them from successfully completing their jobs."
 
Service members, dependents and DoD employees may call the clinic during normal duty hours, 7:30 to 11 a.m. and 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. or go to urgent care after duty hours.
Tags: Yokota Air Base, News
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