No Heat/No Cool Season Over

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Airman 1st Class Michael Gomez, 374th Civil Engineer Squadron heating, ventilation and air conditioning technician, bleads out air from main steam line running into a building on Nov. 8, 2016, at Yokota Air Base, Japan. Each year the 374th CES goes through the process of switching the bases HVAC systems from cool to hot air for the upcoming winter season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson/Released)
Airman 1st Class Michael Gomez, 374th Civil Engineer Squadron heating, ventilation and air conditioning technician, bleads out air from main steam line running into a building on Nov. 8, 2016, at Yokota Air Base, Japan. Each year the 374th CES goes through the process of switching the bases HVAC systems from cool to hot air for the upcoming winter season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson/Released)

No Heat/No Cool Season Over

by: Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson | .
Yokota Air Base | .
published: November 10, 2016
Yokota Air Base, Japan --With winter fast approaching, on Nov. 7th, the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron started flipping the switch, turning on Yokota’s heating, ventilation and air conditioning, or HVAC, systems.

With this year’s fall being colder than average the HVAC winter system startup began 12 days sooner than anticipated. The yearly program, No Heat/No Cool, runs until the five-day average maximum temperature is 62F or until Nov. 19, whichever comes first.

No Heat/No Cool, gives the 374th CES time to preform maintenance on Yokota’s HVAC system as well as save energy and money during the time of year when the HVAC systems are not needed, said Michael J. Haka, 374th CES energy and utilities manager.

According to Haka, Yokota Air Base saved over $330,000 and over 14,000 million British thermal units of energy during this years No Heat/No Cool period.

Starting the HVAC systems over the whole base is a process that takes time, said Airman 1st Class Sean M. Bialecki, 374th CES HVAC journeyman. Starting with ensuring all boiler stations around base are working correctly, checking all the steam pipes running to the buildings are clean and have no leaks, and finally checking the pipes in each building for leaks.

According to Bialecki, the time it takes to check all the working parts of the HVAC systems is essential for the safety of base personnel and the correct operation of the bases HVAC systems.

Although it takes time to get the HVAC systems up and running for winter, most of the maintenance is done on the heating systems during the summer months to ensure a seamless transition when winter comes, said Bialecki.

The order of precedence for turning on the HVAC systems starts with housing, high-use facilities and critical facilities.

After the heat is on at Yokota and the base is well into winter, the 374th CES will be hard at work getting Yokota’s HVAC cooling systems ready for summer, when the cool air is needed to escape Japans hot and humid summers.

 

Tags: Yokota Air Base, News
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