Dr. Orange: The secret nemesis of sick veterans

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Retired Air Force Maj. Wes Carter, at a lake behind his home in Fort Collins, Colo., on August 31, 2016. Carter's connection to the herbicide Agent Orange began in the 1970s, when for six years he served as a crew member on a C-123 as part of his reserve duty at Westover AFB, Mass. Later, in researching a possible connection between his illnesses and possible exposure to Agent Orange, Carter got his first glimpse of Alvin L. Young, known as “Dr. Orange.”  Matt Staver/Special to ProPublica
From Stripes.com
Retired Air Force Maj. Wes Carter, at a lake behind his home in Fort Collins, Colo., on August 31, 2016. Carter's connection to the herbicide Agent Orange began in the 1970s, when for six years he served as a crew member on a C-123 as part of his reserve duty at Westover AFB, Mass. Later, in researching a possible connection between his illnesses and possible exposure to Agent Orange, Carter got his first glimpse of Alvin L. Young, known as “Dr. Orange.” Matt Staver/Special to ProPublica

Dr. Orange: The secret nemesis of sick veterans

by: Charles Ornstein, ProPublica and Mike Hixenbaugh, The Virginian-Pilot | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: October 27, 2016

Editor's note: This is the latest installment of "Reliving Agent Orange", a ProPublica series.

A few years ago, retired Maj. Wes Carter was picking his way through a stack of internal Air Force memos, searching for clues that might help explain his recent heart attack and prostate cancer diagnosis. His eyes caught on several recommendations spelled out in all capital letters:

“NO ADDITIONAL SAMPLING ...”
“DESTROY ALL ...”
“IMMEDIATE DESTRUCTION ...”

A Pentagon consultant was recommending that Air Force officials quickly and discreetly chop up and melt down a fleet of C-123 aircraft that had once sprayed the toxic herbicide Agent Orange across Vietnam. The consultant also suggested how to downplay the risk if journalists started asking questions: “The longer this issue remains unresolved, the greater the likelihood of outside press reporting on yet another ‘Agent Orange Controversy.’”

http://www.stripes.com/1.435863

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