Court to hear whether women should register for draft

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A screen grab shows a Selective Service System web page. A California court is slated to hear arguments on Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015, that challenges the United States male only requirement for registering with the Selective Service which is used in the event that the draft is re-instated.  Selective Service System
From Stripes.com
A screen grab shows a Selective Service System web page. A California court is slated to hear arguments on Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015, that challenges the United States male only requirement for registering with the Selective Service which is used in the event that the draft is re-instated. Selective Service System

Court to hear whether women should register for draft

by: Tara Copp | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: December 04, 2015

WASHINGTON — Whether or not Thursday’s historic decision to allow women in all combat roles may require women to begin registering for the draft faces its first test next week, when a federal lawsuit challenging the male-only registration gets its day in court.

The case, National Coalition for Men vs. the Selective Service System, will be considered by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, in Pasadena, Calif., on Tuesday.

The lawsuit’s day in court coincidentally occurs just days after Secretary of Defense Ash Carter opened all military combat roles to women, a decision he said may affect whether women are required to register for the draft.

“It may do that,” Carter said. “That is a matter of legal dispute right now, and in fact litigation.”

But Carter said the outcome of the court case won’t affect the Pentagon’s decision to move forward.

“That legal determination won't affect what I announce today -- that is, our timetable for the implementation of the decisions I've announced today. But it is an issue that's out there.”

Under the Military Selective Service Act, males must register 30 days after their 18th birthday with the Selective Service System, which could call upon them for compulsory military service in a time of war. They must stay registered until their 26th birthday.

Coalition attorney Marc Angelucci, who will be arguing the case before the Ninth Circuit on behalf of the organization, said Thursday’s decision could have a big impact on the outcome of his case.

“The fact that the military has now opened all combat roles for women can certainly affect this lawsuit,” Angelucci said.  

The case was initially dismissed in 2013 as premature by a lower federal district court, Angelucci said, since the Pentagon had not yet made a final decision on opening combat roles to women. The coalition appealed to the Ninth Circuit, leading to Tuesday’s hearing.

“If the court of appeals does not reverse the dismissal, we will immediately refile this challenge,” Angelucci said. “As long as there are any women in combat there’s no excuse for only forcing males to register for the draft.”

 A senior defense official who worked closely with Carter on Thursday’s decision to allow women in all combat roles called the lawsuit against the Selective Service Agency “a complicated matter.”

“Today obviously changes the facts,” the official said, who spoke to reporters on background late Thursday following Carter’s announcement.

copp.tara@stripes.com
 Twitter:@TaraCopp

 

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