Army medic Samuel Kosgei returns to front of Marine Corps Marathon field

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U.S. Army runner Samuel Kosgei of Junction City, Kan., crosses the finish line in Arlington, Va., as the winner of the 2016 Marine Corps Marathon. Kosgei, who also won in 2014, was timed in 2:23:52.05. C.J. Lin/Stars and Stripes
From Stripes.com
U.S. Army runner Samuel Kosgei of Junction City, Kan., crosses the finish line in Arlington, Va., as the winner of the 2016 Marine Corps Marathon. Kosgei, who also won in 2014, was timed in 2:23:52.05. C.J. Lin/Stars and Stripes

Army medic Samuel Kosgei returns to front of Marine Corps Marathon field

by: C.J. Lin | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: October 31, 2016

ARLINGTON, Va. — Repeating his win from two years ago, Army Spc. Samuel Kosgei claimed first place at the 41st Marine Corps Marathon on Sunday.

Kosgei, a medic stationed at Fort Riley, Kan., won the 26.2 mile race with a time of 2:23:52. Desta Morkama of Arlington, Va., came in second in 2:24:28 and Oscar Santos placed third at 2:25:02.

“Today I felt good all the way,” said Kosgei, who won the 2014 race with a time that was a minute faster. “I stayed controlled and then I made a move, which really worked for me.”

Kosgei, who currently trains on his own by running 80 to 90 miles a week, was hoping to make the Army World Class Athlete Program.

Perry Shoemaker, who placed second at the Army Ten-Miler earlier this month, was the first female finisher with a time of 2:51:47. Army Capt. Meghan Curran of Denver placed second at 2:53:18 and Nicole Irving of Arlington came in third at 2:53:31.

“I was pleased with how I did … but overall, I’m very happy,” said Shoemaker, whose husband is in the Navy. “It is an amazing feeling. I didn’t expect to win it, but it’s great.”

For Curran, the race was a battle as she struggled with dizziness and stomach issues.

“I just did a death march for the last six miles and made it,” Curran said. “It wasn’t quite what I wanted but I survived.”

The race is one full of meaning for Curran, whose sister and father are Marines. She ran with the initials “AWS” drawn on her left hand to remind her of her teammate, 1st. Lt. Ashley White-Stumpf, who was killed in Afghanistan in 2011. Her memory helped her persevere through the race, she said.

“I put it on my left hand so every time I look at my watch, grab a cup of water, I’m reminded of her and to stay strong, Curran said. “I especially needed that today.”

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