Sullivan students transcribe documents for Smithsonian

Base Info
Chloe Bogen, a fifth grade student at The Sullivans School in Yokosuka, Japan, transcribes a document from the Smithsonian Transcription Center. The original source documents are being transcribed by 4/5 multiage students at the School, the largest in the DoDEA Pacific Region. Photo by Steve Parker
Chloe Bogen, a fifth grade student at The Sullivans School in Yokosuka, Japan, transcribes a document from the Smithsonian Transcription Center. The original source documents are being transcribed by 4/5 multiage students at the School, the largest in the DoDEA Pacific Region. Photo by Steve Parker

Sullivan students transcribe documents for Smithsonian

by: Steve Parker | .
Sullivans Elementary School | .
published: October 13, 2015

Yokosuka Navy Base, Japan  Students at The Sullivans School, the largest overseas school in the Department of Defense Education Activity, (DoDEA) located on board Commander Fleet Activities Yokosuka (CFAY) in Yokosuka, Japan, transcribed original documents on their classroom computers working with the Smithsonian Museum on Friday, the 10th of October.  The documents were part of the Digital Volunteers Program run by the Smithsonian Transcription Center. The center opened in 2013 with thousands of documents across 31 projects from eight Smithsonian museums, archives, and libraries.

The students were fifth graders in the  4/5 Multiage program at the Sullivans. The documents the students worked on were transcribed from field biology notes taken by Ira Gabrielson from 1936-1939.  Gabrielson, at the time, was the head of the Bureau of Biological Survey and was transitioning to become the first director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services organization in 1940. The documents described proceedings in Senate meetings and wild bird courtship displays. One passage described a state dinner where “a Brazilian vividly described how he killed a jaguar with a spear” and “a Yak hunt in Tibet.” 

“The students first read a short introduction to transcribing and then proceeded to work on the project.”  Parker stated, “They were amazingly excited about the journals. They worked long and hard to figure out what Ira was writing in cursive. They did not want to stop when school was over. Last year, we transcribed 3 x 5 cards containing the only transcriptions of the Native American Alabama tribe’s language.”

The Smithsonian Transcription Center, in its own words, “seeks to engage the public in making our collections more accessible. We’re working with digital volunteers to transcribe historic documents and collection records to facilitate research and excite the learning in everyone.” More information about the project is available at https://transcription.si.edu/

“Who knew transcribing original sources could be so fun?” said Andrea Lee Santy, one of the students.

“Ira didn’t have very good handwriting, did he?” asked Claire Bogen, another transcriptionist.

The first organized schools for the children of U.S. military personnel serving in the Pacific were established in 1946 during post-World War II reconstruction. Throughout the decades, DoDEA schools evolved to become a comprehensive and high-performing K-12 school system solely dedicated to educating the children of America's heroes. Today, DoDEA Pacific's 48 schools serve nearly 23,000 military-connected children of U.S. Service members and civilian support personnel stationed throughout the Pacific theater. The DoDEA Pacific teaching, administrative and school support team includes more than 3,000 full-time professionals. The schools are geographically organized into four districts: Guam, Japan, Okinawa and South Korea. The Sullivans School is the largest school in DoDEA with a student body of approximately 1,200 in grades K-5.
 

Tags: Yokosuka Naval Base, Base Info
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