Structural maintenance crafts F-16 metals

Base Info
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Charlton Long, an aircraft structural maintenance journeyman with the 35th Maintenance Squadron, cuts metal at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 11, 2016. Power tools like this saw are used to shorten and shape metal, in order to build replacement parts for aircraft. Fabricating aircraft parts internally is cheaper and more efficient than ordering them from outside companies streamlining the Air Force’s maintenance operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jordyn Fetter)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Charlton Long, an aircraft structural maintenance journeyman with the 35th Maintenance Squadron, cuts metal at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 11, 2016. Power tools like this saw are used to shorten and shape metal, in order to build replacement parts for aircraft. Fabricating aircraft parts internally is cheaper and more efficient than ordering them from outside companies streamlining the Air Force’s maintenance operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jordyn Fetter)

Structural maintenance crafts F-16 metals

by: Airman 1st Class Jordyn Fetter, 35th Fighter Wing Public Affairs | .
Misawa Air Base | .
published: January 15, 2016

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan -- When an F-16 Fighting Falcon is grounded due to physical damage, 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft structural maintenance Airmen are called to fabricate and install new parts ensuring the aircraft is ready for its next mission.

The restoration process begins with an initial inspection requiring Airmen to evaluate possible corrosion and broken parts. After damage is identified, the metal is treated with chemicals to remove corrosion, and components of the aircraft are replaced and constructed with powered and manpowered equipment.

Tags: Misawa Air Bae, Base Info
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