Station Fuels receives approximately one-million gallons of fuel

Base Info
Mitsunori Taketa, a Master Labor Contractor with Station Fuels, unscrews a cap on a pipe at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, June 12, 2018. Taketa participated in off-loading of approximately one-million gallons of fuel in support of aircraft on the air station. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Andrew Jones)
Mitsunori Taketa, a Master Labor Contractor with Station Fuels, unscrews a cap on a pipe at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, June 12, 2018. Taketa participated in off-loading of approximately one-million gallons of fuel in support of aircraft on the air station. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Andrew Jones)

Station Fuels receives approximately one-million gallons of fuel

by: Lance Cpl. Andrew Jones | .
MCAS Iwakuni | .
published: June 14, 2018

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION IWAKUNI, Japan -- U.S. Marines, sailors and Japanese Master Labor Contractors, with Station Fuels and Harbor Operations, worked together to safely off-load fuel from a tanker ship at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, June 12, 2018.

The routine transfer of fuel was conducted at the air station’s harbor, and it is scheduled to be used by station squadrons for their aircraft.

Delivery of fuel by ship is unique to the air station. It is one of two Marine Corps Air Stations with a deep water port that posseses the capability of receiving fuel in this manner.

“The harbor is an asset to the air station logistics-wise,” said U.S. Navy Electricians Mate 2nd Class Clark Dixon, with Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron. “Since this is a deep water harbor, we can have larger ships come in and off-load cargo, such as fuel.”

Sailors with Harbor Operations patrolled the harbor during the fuel transfer and set up an oil containment boom around the fuel tanker. The oil containment boom was used as a safety device to prevent the spread of oily substances if a spill were to occur.

Marines, sailors and Master Labor Contractors with Station Fuels connected the ship to fuel lines on the pier. Throughout the day they monitored fuel for quality and the pipes for integrity.

“It seems simple,” said U.S. Navy Aviation Boatswains Mate-Fuels Shawn Gittens, with Headquarters and HeadquartersSquadron. “Some people might say that we just pump gas, but if we don’t do our job safely fuel can end up in the water or bad fuel could potentially be put into an aircraft, costing the government millions of dollars and potentially taking a life.”

Maintaining the fuel supply on the air station helps to uphold the nickname “The Ready Group,” of Marine Aircraft Group 12, a tenant command of the air station, by ensuring that squadrons on the station have the resources that they need to accomplish their mission.

“For station fuels, being mission ready means that at any given time when an aircraft squadron requests fuel, we are able to deliver that fuel in a timely manner,” said Gittens.

Tags: Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Base Info
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