Security Forces exercise team gears up

Base Info
U.S. Airman 1st Class John Rodil, 35th Security Forces basic force protector, simulates firing upon 35 SFS members, while acting as an attacker during Phase II of the operational readiness exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 28, 2014. To make the scenario realistic, members of 35 SFS volunteer to be base aggressors and simulate attacks. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. April Quintanilla)
U.S. Airman 1st Class John Rodil, 35th Security Forces basic force protector, simulates firing upon 35 SFS members, while acting as an attacker during Phase II of the operational readiness exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 28, 2014. To make the scenario realistic, members of 35 SFS volunteer to be base aggressors and simulate attacks. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. April Quintanilla)

Security Forces exercise team gears up

by: Airman 1st Class Patrick S. Ciccarone, 35th Fighter Wing Public Affairs | .
Misawa Air Base | .
published: February 01, 2014

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan  -- The 35th Security Forces Squadron vigilantly protects Airmen here during an operational readiness exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 29, 2014.

The SFS has an exercise-specific team that actively protects the base during a simulated deployment.

"They're here to secure the base," said Master Sgt. William Newcomb, 35 SFS NCO in charge of standardization and evaluation. "They'll be defending against ground attacks and any terrorist activity that could affect the base."

This exercise team trains all year long to hone their abilities for situations that might occur at any given moment, often like what happens during an ORE inject. Newcomb believes these annual exercises sharpen our Airmen's ability to perform their job without failure.

"It gives our guys practice and lets them know what they'll be expected to do once they reach a deployed location," said Newcomb. "It gives them a real-time look at their time tables and to account for their security procedures."

Training for the 35 SFS ordinarily consists of scenarios like anti-robbery, active shooting and foot patrols. Since training for them is year round, OREs allow the team to use tactics they've gained during prior training situations in this simulated combat environment.

While engaged in an ORE, the exercise team's focus shifts from a localized enforcement to a more defensive role.

Newcomb explains that even during situations where there might be an alarm black or alarm blue where cover would have to be taken due to an imminent threat or attack, the 35 SFS Airmen are still out defending the base.

"They're not going to put their guns down and take cover," says Newcomb. "They're going out there to attack and engage the enemy."

Although these scenarios and injects are simulated, the 35 SFS knows when to stop playing war, and start engaging in it.

"You have to take that law enforcement mission and separate it," said Newcomb. "You can train for these kinds of scenarios, but unless you practice, you're never going to be proficient in them."
 

Tags: Misawa Air Bae, Base Info
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