NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka trains Culinary Specialists

Base Info
Senior Chief Culinary Specialist Khoi Pham (far-left), NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka Navy Food Management Team leading chief petty officer, speaks with fleet Culinary Specialists who are receiving food service training provided by NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka NFMT Oct. 5-9 aboard Yokosuka Naval Base.
Senior Chief Culinary Specialist Khoi Pham (far-left), NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka Navy Food Management Team leading chief petty officer, speaks with fleet Culinary Specialists who are receiving food service training provided by NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka NFMT Oct. 5-9 aboard Yokosuka Naval Base.

NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka trains Culinary Specialists

by: Sky M. Laron, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka Director of Corporate Communications | .
FLEACT Yokosuka | .
published: November 04, 2015

YOKOSUKA, Japan – Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Yokosuka Navy Food Management Team (NFMT) members recently conducted food service training and hosted a round table seminar for visiting fleet Culinary Specialists (CS) Oct. 5-9.

As the old battlefield adage goes, ‘an Army marches on its stomach,’ which highlights the importance of military forces being well-provisioned. Napoleon is credited with this saying and obviously knew the importance of good chow.

Whether shipboard, shore based or in the field, it is the job of the men and women manning the galleys and mess decks to feed today’s naval warfighter.

“Food service operations are very important to the fleet,” said Senior Chief Culinary Specialist Khoi Pham, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka NFMT leading chief petty officer. “It is the moral and welfare of every command in the Navy.”

Right now, all across the globe, Culinary Specialists are operating and managing Navy messes, afloat and ashore, which is no small task.

“Without food services the ship can’t do the mission, it can’t do anything,” said Chief Culinary Specialist Justin Godfrey, a CS aboard USS Antietam (CG-54) and seminar participant. “A lot of good information was put out about where we’re going with new innovation and trying to improve everything, which I believe is going to make the Navy better.”

In addition to cooking and serving meals, CSs estimate quantities and types of food items required and assist Supply Officers in ordering and stowage of subsistence items and procurement of equipment and mess gear.

“This was a very important class for students learning how to account for food and how much money they are using each day to feed the crews,” said Chris Scholl, Food Service Management Analyst, NAVSUP FLC Pearl Harbor.

According to Scholl, accurate records keeping helps food service personnel from going too much over or under their budgets and allows them to stick to their directed basic daily food allowance.

Training provided participants guidance on food safety and sanitation as well.

“CSs are feeding our warfighters out there and they need to ensure that they have the proper training to make sure these people they are feeding don’t get sick,” said Sgt. 1st Class Anthony Smith, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka Army Veterinary Food Safety Instructor, NFMT.

Many Sailors who took part in the training felt that they came away with more knowledge and information that would enable them to excel in their rates.

“I thought the class was very important,” said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Antonio McClinton, a CS aboard Naval Air Facility Atsugi and training participant. “We’re feeding you so you’re not out there with an empty stomach and we want to make sure we’re doing it right.”

While DOD continues to make its crucial rebalance to the Asia Pacific region with thousands of Sailors and Marines operating their warships and aircraft on a daily basis in support of strengthening regional alliances, multi-national exercises as well as humanitarian missions, it is the tireless work of CSs that are making this kind of power projection possible – with a full stomach.

NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka, one of eight fleet logistics centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support (GLS), is the Western Pacific region's largest U.S. Navy logistics command, headquartered just 26 miles due south of Tokyo, the enterprise networks more than 20 sites and fuel terminals from Misawa, Japan, to Sydney, Australia; Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean to Guam with a mission to serve the Asia Pacific Region’s forward deployed maritime Warfighter with 24/7 operational logistics support integrating an extensive service provider network to deliver fuel, material, mail and supply chain services across the U.S. Navy’s largest geographical area of responsibility.

Tags: Yokosuka Naval Base, Base Info
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