Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine

Base Info
Three arched bridges stand in front of the Rakan-ji Gohyakurakan, a shrine etched into the side of a mountain, located nearby the Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine, June 29, 2013. The shrine contains five hundred stone statues that where crafted in the 18th century. (Photos by Cpl. Benjamin Pryer)
Three arched bridges stand in front of the Rakan-ji Gohyakurakan, a shrine etched into the side of a mountain, located nearby the Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine, June 29, 2013. The shrine contains five hundred stone statues that where crafted in the 18th century. (Photos by Cpl. Benjamin Pryer)

Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine

by: Cpl. Benjamin Pryer | .
Iwakuni Approach Staff | .
published: July 13, 2013

In 1526, Kamiya Jutei, a Japanese merchant, discovered the Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine.

The mine supplied large quantities of silver for Japan and countries it traded with; most notably during the 16th
and 17th centuries when the silver produced went toward funding the Ouchi, Amago and Mori clans during Sengoku-jidi, the age of the country at war.

While the mine stayed open for nearly 400 years, closing in 1923, it didn’t become a World Heritage Site until 2007. Today, the mine and its surrounding attractions bring in tourists from all over the world.

The mine is located in Omori Town, Ōda City, Shimane prefecture and is an approximate three-hour bus ride from Hiroshima.

For more information on the silver mine and its inclusive landscape, search http://ginzan.city.ohda.lg.jp/wh/en/index.html.

FACT

The Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine became a Wold Heritage Site in 2007. According to the Iwami Ginzan World Heritage Center, a site is a natural property deemed to be worthy of preservation for the benefit of humanity, and it
is chosen based on the Convention concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage.

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