George Washington Sailors wait in longer lines for better food

Base Info
Sailors stationed aboard the U.S. Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) converse during a monthly birthday celebration meal on the mess decks of the ship. The meal was prepared for Sailors with January birthdays and will continue as a tradition throughout the year. (U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Erin Devenberg)
Sailors stationed aboard the U.S. Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) converse during a monthly birthday celebration meal on the mess decks of the ship. The meal was prepared for Sailors with January birthdays and will continue as a tradition throughout the year. (U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Erin Devenberg)

George Washington Sailors wait in longer lines for better food

by: MC3 Ricardo Guzman, USS George Washington Public Affairs | .
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published: February 23, 2013

 

The lines leading to the galley are longer than they’ve ever been in the past. Culinary Specialists (CS) are working a little harder to keep up with all the Sailors coming through.
 
The mess decks are full of people enjoying lunch. This is a typical sight while a ship is underway, but the U.S. Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) has been in port at Fleet Activities, Yokosuka since November.
 
As Sailors close in on the dessert bar, they are greeted by a very enthusiastic man.
 
He’s talking and joking with the Sailors while he’s flipping cups and preparing root-beer floats.
 
He is the reason why Sailors happily wait in a long line. He is Chief Warrant Officer Brian Ware, the food service officer (FSO) aboard USS George Washington.
 
“I was serving on George Washington back in 2003 as a chief, so it’s my second time here,” said Ware. “I cancelled my orders to Naples once the FSO billet opened. I love cooking and what better way to come here when there is no FSO billet open and make changes.”
W
are started his career in the Navy in March 1987 and, through the span of his 26-year career, he has earned a few awards, such as the Capt. Edward F. Ney award for food service excellence, and gained a great work ethic and culinary expertise.
 
One of his newest improvements is setting up his own station for lunch where he provides food cooked to order.
 
“I cook to order for the crew, I get to see every Sailor for lunch and I think we’re the only ship in the Navy that does that,” said Ware. “When I first got on board, I looked at the officer’s brow and the enlisted brow between 10:30 and 11 a.m. and we had about 180 people leaving the ship for lunch, last week we counted, we only had about 15 to 20.”
 
Sailors appreciate the new turn around in the galley as well as the improvement in food quality.
 
“He’s really boosted morale and done a lot for the ship,” said Cryptologic Technician Technical Seaman Amber Newcomb. “The food is better than it has ever been.”
 
For some, working with him is rewarding and educational.
 
“I learned a lot from him, we work hard, but it’s definitely worth it,” said Culinary Specialist Seaman Rodil Lubel. “We do this every day and it looks and tastes good. I have people tell me all the time that food keeps getting better and better.”
 
His chef-coat is full of badges and pins that definitely invoke admiration and respect for those who work under him.
 
“I’m qualified in a lot of certifications and I can give that back to my troops. If they see all the awards and certifications that I have gained through my 26 years, they see me squared away and excited than maybe I can motivate them to stay in and make a career,” said Ware. “They see my name, but I want them to see me as what I was before. I was a seaman recruit all the way to Senior Chief. I want to blend in and cook with my cooks and that’s more important to me. I’m still a CS by heart.”

 

Tags: Yokosuka Naval Base, Base Info
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