F-86F Sabre: Longstanding symbol of U.S.-Japan alliance

Base Info
An F-86F Sabre displays both 13th and 14th Fighter Squadron colors on its tail as it sits in Risner Circle at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Dec. 18, 2018. By mid-1953, Fifth Air Force described the aircraft as the most-suitable fighter-bomber during the Korean War. The aircraft didn’t have operating problems and was noted for its stability at high altitudes. The aircraft remains emblazoned today with both 3rd Air Wing and 35th Fighter Wing shields, symbolizing the U.S.-Japan alliance. (U.S. Air Force photo)
An F-86F Sabre displays both 13th and 14th Fighter Squadron colors on its tail as it sits in Risner Circle at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Dec. 18, 2018. By mid-1953, Fifth Air Force described the aircraft as the most-suitable fighter-bomber during the Korean War. The aircraft didn’t have operating problems and was noted for its stability at high altitudes. The aircraft remains emblazoned today with both 3rd Air Wing and 35th Fighter Wing shields, symbolizing the U.S.-Japan alliance. (U.S. Air Force photo)

F-86F Sabre: Longstanding symbol of U.S.-Japan alliance

by: Senior Airman Sadie Colbert | .
35th Fighter Wing | .
published: January 10, 2019

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan -- Risner Circle at Misawa Air Base, Japan, displays the F-86F as a static aircraft today.

After the first Combined Air Festival in 1980, the Japanese and American base commanders dedicated an F-86F as a symbol of the U.S.-Japan friendship.

The F-86F Sabre began production in 1952, and gained popularity during the Korean War. It displayed a superior ability to survive, had no operating problems and effectively stable at high altitudes. By mid-1953, Fifth Air Force described it as the most suitable fighter-bomber in Korea, downing 818 MIGs during combat.

Tags: Misawa Air Bae, Base Info
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