CAP cadets trained through encampment

Base Info
Senior Airman Thorton Willis, 374th Operations Support Squadron aircrew flight equipment journeyman, helps a Civil Air Patrol cadet don a helmet during the CAP summer encampment at Yokota Air Base, Japan, June 23, 2016. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman David Owsianka/Released)
Senior Airman Thorton Willis, 374th Operations Support Squadron aircrew flight equipment journeyman, helps a Civil Air Patrol cadet don a helmet during the CAP summer encampment at Yokota Air Base, Japan, June 23, 2016. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman David Owsianka/Released)

CAP cadets trained through encampment

by: Senior Airman David Owsianka, 374th Airlift Wing Public Affairs | .
Yokota Air Base | .
published: July 02, 2016

YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- The sound of reveille goes off at 5 a.m. and it's time to begin physical training. While this may take some back to basic military training, a select few within the Civil Air Patrol received a brief experience of what military life is like.

The CAP Yokota Cadet Squadron hosted a summer encampment for 13 cadets at Yokota AB June 19 to June 25, 2016. The cadets were from throughout the Indo-Asia Pacific Region: Osan Air Base, South Korea; Kadena Air Base, Japan; Misawa Air Force, Japan; and Yokota.

Civil Air Patrol's cadet program allows people, aging between 12 to 21-years-old, to progress at their own pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership training, physical fitness and moral leadership.

"This program is important because it helps the cadets with character and leadership development, self-discipline, attention to detail and other values we have within the Air Force," said CAP Lt. Col. David Siemiet, YCS commandant. "The encampment is the first pre-requisite experience they have when they join the civil air patrol."

Throughout the weeklong encampment, the cadets went through a stringent schedule that consisted of formations, physical training, uniform and room inspections, marching in formation, classes and visiting various squadrons throughout the base.

The classes focused on aerospace education, leadership philosophy and military life. Sections the cadets visited included the 374th Maintenance Squadron propulsion flight, 374th Operations Support Squadron aircrew flight equipment, 374th Security Forces Squadron combat arms training and maintenance and the 730th Air Mobility Squadron.

"When I first got here, it was very nerve-racking because the leaders were very strict," said Reagan Sibit, 12, step-daughter of Capt. Nathan Parker, Department of Defense Special Representative to Japan flight commander, CAP cadet. "The encampment helped me have more self-discipline and learn that when I am on a team. There isn’t one leader who does all of the work, it's everyone working together to get the task done. This was a good experience to have gone through for the future."

The CAP leaders hope the cadets improved during their time in the encampment.

"I want the cadets to go back to their units [or lives] and be better in every measureable way so that they can help their respective programs improve," Siemiet said. "The goal of this is to give the cadets a better understanding of the opportunities within the military and the Air Force."

If interested in joining the CAP, visit http://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/. The website can direct individuals to local CAP contacts.

Tags: Yokota Air Base, Base Info
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