6th-graders get career insight, experience from Camp Zama mentors

Base Info
Cpt. Drew Reinbold-Wasson, assigned to Public Health Command Region-Pacific, shows students from Arnn Elementary School sample insects in the entomology laboratory in the PHCR-Pacific building Feb. 5 on Groundhog Job Shadow Day. (U.S. Army Photos by Noriko Kudo)
Cpt. Drew Reinbold-Wasson, assigned to Public Health Command Region-Pacific, shows students from Arnn Elementary School sample insects in the entomology laboratory in the PHCR-Pacific building Feb. 5 on Groundhog Job Shadow Day. (U.S. Army Photos by Noriko Kudo)

6th-graders get career insight, experience from Camp Zama mentors

by: Noriko Kudo, U.S. Army Garrison Japan Public Affairs | .
U.S. Army | .
published: February 11, 2016

CAMP ZAMA, Japan -- Thirty-seven sixth-graders from Arnn Elementary School participated in Groundhog Job Shadow Day Feb. 5 at Camp Zama to get behind-the-scenes experience in their career fields of interest.

Robert Chance, school liaison officer for Child, Youth and School Services, said Groundhog Job Shadow Day is a program "to help the sixth-graders learn about the career fields that are available here on post."

Each student selected a career field they wish to follow when they grow up and was paired in small groups with employees to mentor them for the day.

The employees came from several units/directorates, including the Public Health Command, Public Affairs Office, Directorate of Public Works and Japan Engineer District.

Cpt. Jacob Vincent, assigned to Public Health Command Region-Pacific, said his unit had an opportunity to give five students a glimpse of what public health is about.

Vince said the students observed various areas, such as entomology, biological analysis, industrial hygiene facility, water quality laboratory and health physics.

After job showing at PHCR-Pacific, Vincent said he hopes the students learned more information about something outside of what one traditionally thinks of medicine.

Lance Davis, editorial specialist for the Public Affairs Office, said his group of students had opportunities to participate in "hands-on exercises" to get a glimpse of what PAO does on a day-to-day basis.

Raelyn Flores, sixth-grader from AES who job shadowed in PAO, said she read off the teleprompter to experience being a reporter in front of the camera and it was amazing.

"There is more than just talking," said Raelyn on being a reporter.

Raelyn said she realized "everything is pretty important that you learn at school" to be successful in this field.

Pulani Trenel, sixth-grader from AES who also job shadowed in PAO, said she experienced how to write stories and report the news.

"I really enjoyed this event because we got to experience what we want to be when we grow up," said Pulani.

Paulani learned that it is very important "to meet deadlines" and "to manage time correctly" in the field of journalism.

"They were really enthused," said Davis.

Davis said one of the students asked what it takes to be in this field and he emphasized the importance of "deadlines" and advised them "to manage your time."

He also said he benefited from activities and opportunities to job shadow someone and ask questions when he was young.

"It's the experiences young people have now that shape who they become later in life," said Davis.
Through job shadowing, Chance hopes the students learned "a lot of hard work and dedication goes into each job."

Because this is a small community overseas, Chance said "the community has to come together and work together to support all the kids."

Tags: Camp Zama, Base Info
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